Friday, 7 August 2009

COMPETITION TIME














Okay guys, I am about to do some serious evangelizing to those of you who do not already worship at the throne of Dan Hinkley. 

Dan is the kind of person who makes Ray Lancaster start going all burbly and delighted. That's one way you know he is the real thing. 

He runs a really well-loved American nursery at Heronswood in Washington State, but also is a plant collector of so many years standing, and one way to experience his amazing knowledge and adventures is to read 'The Explorer's Garden". Rare plants that will make your mouth water and your little hand start itching its way across the desk towards the computer mouse....

However until recently you had to get it in hardback. 

It's now out in paperback! And I have a copy to give away! 

At the same time, his follow-up book is out in hardback - this one does "Shrubs and Vines", so stuff like rare witch hazels and rhododendrons. Maybe a bit less practical, but just as, mmmm, mouth-watering. 

So listen if you would like to WIN a FREE copy of the paperback of the Explorer's Garden, which I will post within reason to wherever you live, please leave a comment below. I really recommend the book, he is one of those people who REALLY knows what they are talking about.... even if this recommendation comes from someone who knows that, most of the time, they don't. 

9 comments:

Fluffymuppet said...

Oooh, haven't heard of him... runs off to Google to rectify lack of knowledge... :)

VP said...

OOOOOOOOHHHHHHH! He gave a talk to Bath Gardening Society in April. You get a really clarrrrsy set of speakers there :)

Bay Area Tendrils Garden Travel said...

Sad but true, the horticultural community lost DH's Heronswood when it was sold some years ago to George Ball/Burpee & Co. - the name now refers to an online version, heronswood.com - not the 'destination' nursery.
Despite attempts by a specially formed non-profit to purchase the property in order to preserve the magnificent gardens & countless rare species cultivated there, the day came not long ago when the group had to face the reality that it was not going to be possible to raise the funds (millions of dollars) to keep alive the dream of Heronswood.
Dan and Robert have created a wonderful new garden: Windcliff.
Alice
btw, I, too, love the book, Explorer's Garden. It holds a special place in my library.

NewShoot said...

Does emotional blackmail work?
I just cracked a tooth in a bizarre accident with a visitor collecting plants and a flying bulldog clip. Now I have to go to the dentist which I hate....

If I had a nice book to read in the waiting room it might not seem so bad....

;-)

emmat said...

Emotional blackmail will be taken into account by the muses who oversee lottery-type competitions.

I'm so stupid not to have known that about Heronswood, and thanks to Alice for putting us straight. I think we in Britain were equally worried about the future of Great Dixter so we were very relieved when a consortium managed to raise the money to keep that in trust, it really is worrying the fact that gardens can't be preserved very easily.

VP said...

Now there's a word that made Christopher Lloyd see red - preserved!

It's quite a dilemma - do you preserve a garden that so associated with a particular person as close as possible to its final state, or do you carry on within the spirit of the place and person? After all, when they were alive, the garden would be ever changing.

I seem to remember that he had quite a lot of choice words on the subject, particularly with regard to the National Trust and gardens such as Sissinghirst...

Let's have a heated debate!

Bay Area Tendrils Garden Travel said...

Agreed, preserve is a poor choice of words. Visiting Sissinghurst - a perfect example. Certainly a garden, any garden, changes to reflect or incorporate a contemporary perspective on plants (and design?).
Poor choice of words, on my part. People loved Heronswood and simply wished for the rarities that Dan had botanized & propagated to be protected and not lost forever: And there was the hope that the gardens would continue to be enjoyed by generations. They too, I'm sure, would have changed and evolved.

I thought about this issue a good deal when visiting Stoneacre during Rosemary Alexander's tenure there. It was interesting to hear her talk about dealing with the National Trust.

colleen said...

Oh "within the spirit" I reckon, Veep - evolution and all that.

VP said...

Colleen - I'm with you on that score. I raised a few hackles at NT HQ when I tried to have a discussion about it.

Alice - I wasn't having a go at you or Emma for your choice of words. It's a subject I'm genuinely interested in and I haven't really seen anyone in the blogosphere tackle it - if they have, sorry for my ignorance and let's see it! I'm fascinated to hear your account of what Rosemary Alexander said on the subject.